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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
five days in syr syria. as they wrestle for power, i want to bring in abc's foreign affairs correspondent martha radda raddatz. >> reporter: they ambush bid a dozen heavily armed men. one of the rebels they were with was exkutd on the spot in front of them. they were blindfolded, hands down and threatened with death. he talked about it after he was freed this morning. >> they made us choose who would be shot first. they pretended to shoot gazi several times. >> reporter: gazi is one of the crew. they escaped at a check point after a fire fight where two of the kidnappers were killed. is still an american freelance journalist who is still hostage in syria. is this a reminder how out of control things are in syria. a conflict, as you know that has already clamd more than 40,000 lives. >> so many dangerous journeys into syria by reporters. and we think of all those who live there and who have suffered so much. thank you, martha, reporting in. we did celebrate the news of richard engel today. >>> we move on next to the holiday. exodus under way as 93.3 million americans plan a t
in the mission. diane? >> thank you so much, martha raddatz reporting in. >>> and now, we go overseas to syria. the rebels still on the move, near the capital damascus. the assad regime, still corralling its chemical weapons. and abc's alex marquardt got a call to travel at night and meet with a defector, who knows about those weapons. a former general in the ruling regime. >> reporter: the rebels have taken the fight to syria's biggest cities. today, battling near assad's stronghold, his palace in damascus. while fighters have overrun one of the regime's largest military bases, outside the city of aleppo. american officials say they fear the likelihood of assad using chemical weapons is rising and say they have proof they've been prepared. we went to meet a man who shares those fears. driving along a dark, back country reed near turkey's border with syria. his name is adnan sillou. he told us that until 2008, he was a chief of staff in the chemical weapons program. he said he worked on the defense side, in charge of preparing troops for dealing with attacks and safety equipment. what specific
krugman, on sunday for "this week." >>> and now, we go overseas to syria, where people are fleeing amid fears that the assad regime will unleash chemical weapons. the region around the capital, damascus, now a battle zone. 2 million syrians now on the run, many of them children. and it is extremely difficult for journalists to enter that country and cover the chaos. but abc's alex marquardt pushed across the border tonight and he is there. alex? >> reporter: we've spent the day among the thousands of refugees living here, and the conditions are miserable. rain has turned the roads to rivers of mud, there's no power or gas for heat, and it's only getting colder by the day. the rain poured as we approached the crossing into syria. the first stop, a rebel checkpoint. tanks and men armed with ak-47s. once past them, a narrow, winding road that led us to white tents in a sea of red mud. in it, the faces of this growing crisis. children huddled around the only source of warmth -- a tiny campfire. they're part of the mass exodus, families fleeing the crossfire of syria's bloody civil war. for
days in syria, and highlights the danger in the shadows there. as the rebels and the terrorists and president assad wrestles for power, i want to bring in abc's foreign affairs correspondent martha raddatz. >> reporter: good evening match truly terrifying ordeal for richard engel and his crew. they were ambushed by more than a dozen heavily armed men, believed to be loyalists to assad's government. one of the rebels they were with was executed on the spot in front of them. they were blindfolded, hands bound and threatened with death. he talked about it after he was freed this morning. >> they made us choose who would be shot first. and when we refused there were mock shootings. they pretended to shoot gazi several times. >> reporter: gazi is one of the crew. they escaped with the help of rebels at a check point after a fire fight where two of the kidnappers were killed. there is still a young american freelance journalist, austin tice, who has been held hostage since august in syria. and this is all a reminder how out of control things are in syria. a conflict, as you know that
>>> this is "world news." tonight, dangerous weapons. the u.s. warns the strongman of syria not to use the chemical weapons he has loaded, ready to go at an airfield. so, what will the u.s. do next? >>> made in america claims a kind of victory. apple announcing they will bring some jobs back from overseas. but is this the start of something even bigger? >>> hooked. the mom spending up to $200 a month of her virtual farm. and we'll show you other games which keep you coming back with a secret every six seconds. >>> and, the perfect gift made so easy. do you want to create this look under the christmas tree? >> oh, my god! >> scientists tonight give you the simple, amazing way to do it every time. >>> good evening. we begin with the worldwide reaction today to a dangerous move in syria. chemicals, dead lly gas loaded onto weapons near an airfield there. one drop could kill within minutes. so, world leaders are mobilizing tonight, deciding what they're going to do. and abc's senior foreign affairs correspondent martha raddatz takes us inside that story. >> reporter: today, hill
weapons in the hands of the brutal regime in syria. chemicals so deadly, one drop can kill within minutes. abc's senior foreign affairs correspondent martha raddatz on these weapons and whether it means the u.s. may be forced to take action. >> reporter: the latest intelligence is alarming. officials telling abc news the u.s. is now seeing specific signs that the syrian regime may be preparing to use the chemical sarin against opposition forces. sarin is an extremely toxic substance that can kill a person in a matter of minutes with only one drop. the victims suffocated from the paralyzing effects of the toxin. this new intelligence has the obama administration so concerned, harsh warnings came today from the president himself. >> i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences, and you will be held accountable. >> reporter: a senior official tells abc news that there are contingency plans for mi
down with abc's barbara walters at the white house this afternoon. and he said something about syria that signals a whole new day for the u.s. barbara walters is here right now with what happened at the white house today. barbara? >> reporter: just a year ago this month, i met with president assad in damascus and i questioned him about the slaughter of his people. since then, 40,000 people have been killed. well, today, president obama had some big news. for the first time, he is putting the syrian opposition on the path to be recognized as the new government if and when assad falls. i'd like to talk about syria. do you plan to recognize the opposition and give them some legitimacy? >> we've made a decision that the syrian opposition coalition is now inclusive enough, is reflective and representative enough of the syrian population, that we consider them the legitimate representative of the syrian people, in opposition to the assad regime, and so we will provide them recognition and obviously with that recognition comes the responsibilities on the part of that coalition. >> reporter:
're still talking, diane. >> two and a half weeks away. thank you so much, jake. >>> and now, we go to syria. tinderbox tonight as even allies of the ruling regime are signaling the end may be near for president assad. and the powerful head of nato is also signaling change is coming. abc's senior foreign affairs correspondent martha raddatz on the end game and what danger it poses for the united states. >> reporter: it could all end soon here in damascus. with the startling word from nato and now even president assad's staunch ally russia, that the brutal dictator's days are numbered. that's because while assad is still in control in the capital, rebels are moving closer. now, just outside in the suburbs. our bbc colleague jeremy bowen saw it first hand, in a neighborhood where assad's forces have tried to stop the rebel advance, pounding the buildings and homes with air strikes and artillery. the battle is bloody. at the regime's military hospital, there are said to be 40 wounded, treated a day. while the rebels, like this fighter who lost both feet, received treatment from a dentist. their
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)